SOLAR VIDEOS

Solar DIY Videos on YouTube

DIY Boat Solar Power Solution for LED Lighting

Sun, 07/20/2014 - 12:06 AM

M101 DIY SOLAR PANEL KIT

Fri, 05/9/2014 - 08:14 AM

DIY 15$ 40w Solar Panel

Mon, 05/5/2014 - 12:28 AM

DIY Portable Solar Panel Stand for $10

Mon, 05/5/2014 - 12:10 AM

Homemade Solar Panels Diy tutorial

Sun, 03/30/2014 - 02:12 AM

Solar panel install to SkyMax grid tie inverter DIY How To

Thu, 03/13/2014 - 07:36 AM

Make Solar Panels DIY | Build Wind Turbines Tutorial | How to Build Solar and Wind Energy System

Wed, 03/5/2014 - 07:55 AM

Make Solar Panel at Home | How to Build Solar Panels DIY | Learn to Make Your Own Solar Panels

Wed, 03/5/2014 - 07:14 AM

The DIY World Installing Solar Panels On A Home In Australia PT4

Sun, 02/23/2014 - 10:37 AM

The DIY World Installing Solar Panels On A Home In Australia PT3

Fri, 02/21/2014 - 11:11 PM

Solar Panels - How it Works YouTube Videos

How Solar Power Solar Panels Work by SolarCity mp4

Thu, 06/19/2014 - 07:15 PM

How Solar Panels Work - Aztec Renewable Energy

Thu, 05/15/2014 - 03:03 PM

How Do Solar Panels Work? Bonus! Simple trick to increase your solar output power

Wed, 05/7/2014 - 05:46 AM

[solar energy how it works] Solar Energy 101 - How Solar Panels Work

Tue, 05/6/2014 - 03:43 AM

How Solar Panels Work - Uses The Sun To Create Free Electricity MP4 2

Mon, 05/5/2014 - 04:38 PM

[solar energy for home] How Solar Panels Work

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 12:28 PM

Solar Cell :: How it Works?

Sat, 03/15/2014 - 02:25 AM

Solar Cell System - Solar Cell How It Works

Wed, 01/22/2014 - 03:54 AM

How solar panels work 2

Tue, 12/24/2013 - 12:07 AM

Doc Physics - How Solar Panels Work - Convert Sunlight to Electricity in Your Own Backyard

Thu, 12/12/2013 - 05:30 PM

Solar Projects In Google News

First Solar eyes 370MW Chile PV - Recharge

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 02:51 PM

Three other solar projects adding up to 138MW were registered along with two wind projects totaling up to 347MW. It says an additional 448MW of solar PV projects are under construction. By comparison, wind power in operation totals 682MW, with another  
 

Solar tipped to be big winner from US$50 billion BRICS bank - PV-Tech

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 11:40 AM

Although actual BRICS funding and projects will “take a little bit of time” to materialise, the NDB “is very exciting” for solar development and would “make [solar projects] feasible”, said Griffith-Jones. Griffiths-Jones said that with the NBD  
 

Renewables Program Contracts 932 Solar Projects - ecoRI news

Sun, 07/20/2014 - 12:16 PM

More than 930 Massachusetts residents and businesses recently signed contracts to install solar electricity systems as part of the latest round of Solarize Massachusetts. The systems contracted through this round of Solarize Mass constitute 6.1
 

Bishop Tribe launching solar projects - Inyo Register

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 11:24 PM

Tribal job trainees Harlan Dewey, Ty Poncho and Chris Aukee (l-r) install solar panels on a home on the Bishop Reservation as a part of a program with non-profit solar installer, GRID Alternatives. Another round of installations begins next week, with
 

San Bernardino County would be powerfully served by allowing solar projects to ... - San Bernardino Sun

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 05:29 PM

Time flies; this is a well-known cliché and those of us in our 50s can certainly attest to its veracity. Seems like just yesterday I was wearing a leisure suit and going to a disco. OK, I really only did that once. But we're halfway through 2014
 

Schneider Electric backs winning solar projects - Biztech Africa

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 12:24 PM

The “Rhome for DenCity” and “Phileas” projects sponsored by Schneider Electric have won the 1st and 2nd prizes at the Solar Decathlon Europe 2014. As a Diamond partner of the Solar Decathlon Europe 2014 held in Versailles (France) Schneider Electric  
 

PACE Could Drive More Solar Adoption In Commercial Market - CleanTechnica

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 07:18 AM

In the United States, access to third-party financing has been a main driver in bringing solar projects of all sizes across the finish line. While wide availability of third-party power purchase agreements (PPAs) and leases has enabled rapid solar
 

TerraForm Power, Operator of Solar Plants, Prices IPO at Top of Range - New York Times

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 01:06 AM

Recharge
TerraForm, which is known in industry parlance as a yieldco, is essentially the repository for its parent company's solar projects. By going public, the yieldco can use the stock market to raise money to support its power initiatives at a significantly SunEdison spinoff prices at $25 a share in IPOSTLtoday.comSunEdison powers up solar power carve-outIFR AsiaSunEdison: The Real Winner Of The TerraForm Power IPOSeeking Alphaall 10  
 

TerraForm, Operator of Solar Power Projects, Prices IPO at Top of New Range - New York Times

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 12:22 AM

Recharge
TerraForm, which is known in industry parlance as a yieldco, is essentially the repository for its parent company's solar projects. By going public, the yieldco can use the stock markets to raise money to support its various power initiatives at SunEdison spinoff prices at $25 a share in IPOSTLtoday.comSunEdison powers up solar power carve-outIFR AsiaSunEdison: The Real Winner Of The TerraForm Power IPOSeeking Alphaall 9  
 

Soltage-Greenwood Secures $70M Equity Financing For Solar Projects - Solar Industry

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 06:51 PM

Together, the consortium of investors has committed than $110 million of investment into 13 Soltage-Greenwood solar projects, located in five states with a combined generating capacity of 45 MW. Once commissioned, electricity will be sold Soltage-Greenwood Gets $70 Million for Seven US Solar ProjectsBusinessweekall 4  
 
 

California Solar Projects In Google News

L.A. to Break Ground on Big Desert Solar Project - KCET

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 11:20 PM

Recharge
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and a handful of solar contractors will celebrate the start of construction Wednesday on the Beacon Solar Project near the Kern County town of Cantil. The 250-megawatt project will be built on land LADWP readies Beacon Solar workRechargeall 3  
 

NRG Energy Buys 4-MW Caribbean Solar Project from Toshiba - Zacks.com

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 09:40 PM

NRG Energy, Inc. (NRG - Analyst Report) announced that it has acquired a 4-megawatt (MW ac) Spanish Town Estate Solar project, located in the island of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), from Toshiba International Corporation (Toshiba). The  
 

Proposed Solar Plant Would Kill More Than Twice as Many Birds As Ivanpah - KCET

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 09:17 PM

A solar power tower facility proposed for Riverside County would kill or injure than twice as many birds with its concentrated solar radiation as compared to an existing solar project in San Bernardino County, according to a document published by  
 

The Coming Storage Boom: Project Proposals Nearly Double California's ... - Greentech Media

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 11:57 AM

The Coming Storage Boom: Project Proposals Nearly Double California's Sanders compared the present storage rush to the early days of California's renewable portfolio standard, when wind and solar power interconnection requests added up to enough projects to supply three times the mandate's needs. Still, it's certainly a
 

Battle lines form -- farms vs. solar vs. high-speed rail - Environment & Energy Publishing

Tue, 07/15/2014 - 07:20 PM

Tension is mounting in California over shrinking farmland as solar developers, oil companies and the state's planned bullet train fight for open space. An alliance that includes Thompson said there are other places to put solar projects. "A lot of
 

Wind Industry Attacks California Solar Subsidies - The Heartland Institute

Tue, 07/15/2014 - 06:20 AM

Hydrogen Fuel News
"There is no reason for the State Legislature and Governor Brown to extend a property tax exemption to large scale solar energy projects at this time," said Nancy Rader, executive director of the California Wind Energy Association, in a press statement.Solar power sets a record in CaliforniaSan Gabriel Valley TribuneAs Arizona wrestles with solar's costs, industry slowsArizona RepublicNew Jersey Solar Sector Achieves Some Stability -- at Least for NowNJ SpotlightArizona Capitol Times -Energy Collectiveall 101  
 

Solar power sets a record in California - San Gabriel Valley Tribune

Sun, 07/13/2014 - 06:34 AM

But for California, solar projects like those you see in the Mojave Desert are making a difference in the daily supply of electricity to homes. “On the hottest days, when everyone has the AC cranking, solar is literally keeping the lights on  
 

City Of Palmdale, Constellation And PsomasFMG Dedicate 976-Kilowatt Solar ... - Power Online (press release)

Fri, 07/11/2014 - 04:52 PM

In 2010, PsomasFMG completed the largest operational school solar system in Southern California, a 9.6 MW project across 10 schools in the Antelope Valley Union High School District. Utilizing Power Purchase Agreements and requiring no capital outlay 
 

Proposed Amendment To California's Proposition 13: The Impact Of AB-2372 On ... - Mondaq News Alerts (registration)

Fri, 07/11/2014 - 02:08 PM

Proposed Amendment To California's Proposition 13: The Impact Of AB-2372 On Today, in California, the original beneficiaries of the Active Solar Energy System Exclusion for a given property are able to avoid reassessment unless one party acquires over 50% of the ownership interests in a qualifying solar project. This has
 

PVNavigator, LLC Signs a Power Purchase Agreement with Southern California ... - AltEnergyMag (press release)

Thu, 07/10/2014 - 10:04 PM

Project Navigator, Ltd.'s (PNL) PV solar development operating group, PVNavigator, LLC has entered into a Power Purchase Agreement with Southern California Edison for a 3MW (AC) solar photovoltaic (PV) facility on the County of San Bernardino's closed 
 
 

New Jersey Solar Projects In Google News

SPI Solar sells large solar farm project in China, starts another - Sacramento Business Journal

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 09:28 PM

SPI Solar also is working on utility-scale solar projects in New Jersey and Hawaii, as well as with turnkey residential solar systems that include, materials, design, construction and financing. Mark Anderson covers technology, banking and finance  
 

Maser to Serve as Consultant as Moorestown Explores Solar Project Possibilities - Patch.com

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 07:21 PM

Maser began as a consulting firm operating out of a Marlboro, NJ home in 1984, according to its website. It has since grown to a company with 15 locations in New Jersey, New York and across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions. It is headquartered in
 

Climate Campaign Tipping Point? Unions Get on Board - Labor Notes

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 06:48 PM

Houses in Tuckerton, New Jersey, were flooded by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Since the storm, area unions have been educating “Local 3 has taken a big lead in solar projects and restoration projects. Members know about that and can relate very well to 
 

Solar more than doubled share of new capacity in US for first half of 2014 - PV-Tech

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 11:53 AM

According to the report, other notable solar projects connected in the month included an 8.2MW project in Somerset County, New Jersey from which the electricity generated will be sold to pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly. The plant will have an expected  
 

Lighthouse Solar is getting off the Solarcoaster - Your Renewable News (press release)

Sun, 07/20/2014 - 02:26 PM

BOULDER, Colo., July 17, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Lighthouse Solar, a Boulder, Colorado based solar installation business, announced today that it is getting out of the installation business in Colorado. Market conditions created by Xcel Energy and the PUC 
 

Perciasepe departure adds to EPA brain drain Russians sanctioned, can turn to ... - Politico

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 02:11 PM

No date is set for the New Jersey auction, but the administration will plans auctions for an area near Maryland next month and off the coast of Massachusetts sometime in the coming year. OP-ED WATCH: Former Deputy Interior Secretary David Hayes  
 

Zuckerberg default claim - San Diego Source (subscription)

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 08:10 PM

(AP) -- The federal government is proposing leases for windmill power projects off the New Jersey coast. The federal Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Ocean Management on Thursday proposed sale of leases for nearly 344,000 acres offshore New  
 

Lighthouse Solar is getting off the Solarcoaster - AltEnergyMag (press release)

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 07:36 PM

Lighthouse Solar, a Boulder, Colorado based solar installation business, announced today that it is getting out of the installation business in Colorado. Market conditions created by Xcel Energy and the PUC have made operating in Colorado too difficult  
 

Soltage-Greenwood Gets $70 Million for Seven U.S. Solar Projects - Bloomberg

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 03:37 PM

Soltage-Greenwood, a joint venture formed last year between Soltage LLC and Libra Group's Greenwood Energy, has raised $70 million to build seven solar farms across Massachusetts and North Carolina. The photovoltaic power plants will have a total 
 

SPI Solar completes sale of $21.8M in stocks, convertible bonds - Sacramento Business Journal

Tue, 07/15/2014 - 09:01 PM

SPI Solar is also working on utility-scale solar projects in New Jersey and Hawaii, said Steve Kircher, chief strategy officer with the company. Mark Anderson covers technology, banking and finance, medtech and biotech, venture capital, energy, mining  
 
 

Colorado Solar Projects In Google News

Three local towns light the way in latest round of Solarize Mass - Berkshire Eagle

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 04:19 AM

MassCEC officials report of the 932 solar projects in 15 cities and towns across Massachusetts, 84 property owners enrolled in the Great Barrington/Egremont collaboration, 18 in Adams, the Whatley/Williamsburg/Chesterfield partnership with 85 and  
 

Lighthouse Solar is getting off the Solarcoaster - RenewablesBiz

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 07:52 PM

Lighthouse Solar, a Boulder, Colorado based solar installation business, announced today that it is getting out of the installation business in Colorado. Market conditions created by Xcel Energy and the PUC have The company is shifting its focus to  
 

A place in the sun - Colorado Springs Independent

Wed, 07/16/2014 - 07:02 AM

Now, SunShare, started by 2009 Colorado College grad David Amster-Olszewski, is growing by leaps and bounds and holds the promise of making its founder another Bill Gates, Steve Jobs or Elon Musk ("Sunblock for SunShare," Aug. 7, 2013). The company
 

13 startups in Techstars' Boulder class of 2014 - Boulder County Business Report

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 06:46 PM

13 startups in Techstars' Boulder class of 2014The Lassy Project, led by former University of Colorado football player John Guydon, is an app that helps parents track their children and notify the community of missing children within seconds. Loop Labs, based in Denver, makes a sensor for  
 

Opower Eyeing The Community Solar Market - CleanTechnica

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 01:41 PM

with utilities about being involved in the process. He pointed to the emergence of community-scale solar in Colorado and other states as a way for power companies to offer customers an equity stake in solar projects while potentially avoiding net
 

As Arizona wrestles with solar's costs, industry slows - Arizona Republic

Sun, 07/13/2014 - 08:20 AM

As Arizona wrestles with solar's costs, industry slowsUtilities in the state have been held to an expensive renewable-energy standard, jobs have been added, and solar projects have been installed at a rapid-fire pace. But after a period of explosive growth, the industry that Arizona helped pioneer is  
 

Ruling is victory for solar energy - DesMoinesRegister.com

Fri, 07/11/2014 - 03:32 PM

The ruling will help tip the scales for solar by legalizing another way for people and governments to pay for solar projects, said Barry Shear, president and CEO of Eagle Point Solar. "This ruling now makes other solar projects like this viable," he  
 

5 Tribal Land and Water Rights Bills Get SCIA Attention - Indian Country Today Media Network

Thu, 07/10/2014 - 04:05 PM

The tribe currently has three solar projects in different stages of development. Pueblos of New Mexico – Mike Canfield, President and CEO of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (IPCC) owned and While the tribe is presently able to supply its main
 

5 Tribal Land and Water Rights - Indian Country Today Media Network

Thu, 07/10/2014 - 04:05 PM

The tribe currently has three solar projects in different stages of development. Pueblos of New Mexico – Mike Canfield, President and CEO of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (IPCC) owned and While the tribe is presently able to supply its main
 

First Solar Positioned To Capitalize On Exploding U.S. Residential Market (FSLR) - Seeking Alpha

Mon, 07/7/2014 - 07:02 PM

Solar systems are now being installed at the point of consumption rather than vast distances away from the general population which is the case for utility scale solar projects. According to industry sources the US solar industry achieved a number of  
 
 

Department of Energy Solar Projects

Fitch Affirms Genesis Solar LLC's $852MM Total Trust Ctf and Bank Facilities ... - Fort Mills Times

Fri, 07/11/2014 - 10:34 PM

Fitch Affirms Genesis Solar LLC's $852MM Total Trust Ctf and Bank Facilities In accordance with Fitch's criteria for investment grade solar projects, Opco debt service coverage ratios (DSCR) average 1.98x under a one-year P99 generation scenario, demonstrating strong resilience to low solar resources. (Revenue Risk- Volume
 

Fitch Affirms Genesis Solar LLC's $852MM Total Trust Ctf and Bank Facilities ... - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com (press release)

Fri, 07/11/2014 - 10:05 PM

Fitch Affirms Genesis Solar LLC's $852MM Total Trust Ctf and Bank Facilities In accordance with Fitch's criteria for investment grade solar projects, Opco debt service coverage ratios (DSCR) average 1.98x under a one-year P99 generation scenario, demonstrating strong resilience to low solar resources. (Revenue Risk- Volume  
 

Fitch Affirms Genesis Solar LLC's $852MM Total Trust Ctf and Bank Facilities ... - DigitalJournal.com

Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:52 PM

Fitch Affirms Genesis Solar LLC's $852MM Total Trust Ctf and Bank Facilities In accordance with Fitch's criteria for investment grade solar projects, Opco debt service coverage ratios (DSCR) average 1.98x under a one-year P99 generation scenario, demonstrating strong resilience to low solar resources. (Revenue Risk- Volume  
 

Fitch Affirms Genesis Solar LLC's $852MM Total Trust Ctf and Bank Facilities ... - Business Wire (press release)

Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:50 PM

Fitch Affirms Genesis Solar LLC's $852MM Total Trust Ctf and Bank Facilities In accordance with Fitch's criteria for investment grade solar projects, Opco debt service coverage ratios (DSCR) average 1.98x under a one-year P99 generation scenario, demonstrating strong resilience to low solar resources. (Revenue Risk- Volume  
 

QBotix Announces Over 80 Megawatts Of Projects Under Contract Globally - ElectricNet (press release)

Thu, 07/10/2014 - 05:27 AM

in solar PV project economics with the optimized Robotic Tracking System (RTS), today announced at Intersolar North America (Booth #9711) that it has than 80 megawatts (MW) of solar projects under contract, with several already under
 

India powers toward renewable energy: Part III - Renewable Energy Focus

Wed, 07/9/2014 - 08:13 PM

The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), Government of India and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have developed an online Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (IREEED) that aims at disseminating information  
 

WWF Disputes FEF Figures on Solar Projects - Manila Channel

Wed, 07/9/2014 - 08:08 AM

When WWF's own energy experts computed the cost of the new solar projects based on Feed-in-Tariff (FiT) rates and current electricity prices – the cost was just a little over PHP3 billion. “WWF is ready to show its computations. FEF should immediately
 

As the Solar Industry Eyes Storage, Experts at Intersolar Talk About Key ... - Greentech Media

Wed, 07/9/2014 - 12:31 AM

DOE is supporting research that aims to drive the cost of grid-scale energy storage technology to less than $100 per kilowatt-hour -- a tenfold decrease from today's typical costs of $1,000-and-up per kilowatt-hour. Most of today's grid-scale storage  
 

QBotix Announces Over 80 Megawatts of Projects Under Contract Globally - AltEnergyMag (press release)

Tue, 07/8/2014 - 05:52 PM

in solar PV project economics with the optimized Robotic Tracking System (RTS), today announced at Intersolar North America (Booth #9711) that it has than 80 megawatts (MW) of solar projects under contract, with several already under  
 

QBotix Announces Over 80 Megawatts of Projects Under Contract Globally - Virtual Press Office (press release)

Tue, 07/8/2014 - 05:34 PM

in solar PV project economics with the optimized Robotic Tracking System (RTS), today announced at Intersolar North America (Booth #9711) that it has than 80 megawatts (MW) of solar projects under contract, with several already under  
 
 

The Green Life

Ideas for living well and doing good from Sierra magazine.

Hiking Guru Shares Perfect Paths

Fri, 05/30/2014 - 05:15 PM

Bob Manning at a trailheadRobert Manning is a hiking guru. At the University of Vermont, he researches and teaches park managment, which in practice means that he does a lot of hiking. With his wife, Martha, he cowrote the book Walking Distance (Oregon State University Press), which details 30 walks for any hiker's bucket list. Sierra spoke with Manning about his book, his experience with park management, and the best trail in the world.

The subtitle of your book is Extraordinary Hikes for Ordinary People. Who's "ordinary"? I mean, what's the face of the American hiker today?

I think it’s quite a cross-section, but the "ordinary people" part of the book is something that Martha and I feel strongly about. That’s the main purpose of the book, really: to get people walking more. Compared with people in a lot of the countries we’ve visited, not a lot of Americans are out there walking. With this book, we’re trying to do something about that, to get people to explore and create and ultimately protect these places.

A section of the Muir TrailYou have a strong connection to the John Muir Trail in particular, which you call one of your top 10 walks in the world.

I have a long and deep relationship with the John Muir Trail. When I graduated from college, it was 1968, and the Vietnam War was raging, and so I joined the Coast Guard. I enjoyed living in the city, but even more I enjoyed getting out to Yosemite. It really convinced me that I wanted something to do with the National Parks. That’s also how I became aware of John Muir and the Sierra Club. 

I always get a kick out of hiking above the tree line, of visiting places that I’d been seeing in Sierra Club calendars for years, thinking, "I really want to go there." Hiking over John Muir Pass and then on to Gifford Pinchot Pass -- the legacy of American conservation is just written into the landscape. To me, there’s no mountain range that’s more beautiful and friendly and engaging than the Sierras. That, combined with the Muir legacy, makes the trail my favorite hike.

Manning views the Colorado river nestled in the depths of the Grand CanyonYou’re an expert in park management. What’s your take on how the John Muir Trail is managed?

It has been around for a long time, so it’s well marked and well managed. One area where it excels is the permit system.

What makes a good permit system? The only innovation I’m aware of is the Grand Canyon's rafting permit system, which switched to a weighted lottery. I should also mention that you profile a hike along the Colorado River in your book.

The rafting waitlist was 20 years [laughs], and that can’t work. The John Muir Trail innovation is the simplicty of a single permit that cuts through two national parks and two U.S. Forest Service areas. It would be daunting if one had to get a permit from those four entities and then had to coordinate the dates. At Yosemite in general, they allocate things in a way that's easy for the user, even when it's not easy for them. 

Hiking the Camino de SantiagoSo nationally, we’ve got some good parks. What about internationally? In Walking Distance, you list a number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites, such as El Camino de Santiago, in northern Spain and parts of France.

UNESCO sites are very sucessfully managed. It’s the Parks Service ramped up on a global scale. For a country to get the status, they have to have a plan in place to manage it. And they take that very seriously. 

El Camino de Santiago is a Catholic pilgrimage, and yet there’s a mix of people that there.

The mix, the diversity of people, on the Camino is probably the most on any trail that I’ve walked. We met people from all over the world. Even more impressive, we came across people of all age groups. The religious significance is obviously important, but I’d say that a large portion of the people we encountered were not walking for religious reasons.

In your book, you focus on provencial hikes like the Camino and wilderness hikes like the Muir Trail. What about urban hiking? 

Martha and I have really begun to embrace urban walks. One that we did this summer is what’s called the River Thames Walk in England. It starts at the source in the Gloucestershire and goes right through London -- which takes three days -- and then on to the sea. Martha and I would like to include urban and suburban walks in a future book. We love, for example, that portion of the California Coastal Trail from Muir Beach south to Cliff House. We sort of christened it "the Golden Gate Way."

--interview by Cedar Attanasio / all photos courtesy of Robert Manning

You can learn more about Robert and Martha Manning, and 30 of their favorite hikes -- including Vermont's Long Trail, British Columbia's West Coast Trail, and Florida's Ocala Trail -- on their website.

READ MORE:

6 Most Dangerous Hiking Trails

Pro Hiking Tips: Excercises

Breathtaking Canyons

 

 

Defending The F-Word

Wed, 05/28/2014 - 02:59 PM

Fracking protest sign

The oil and gas industry dislikes the noun fracking, shorthand for hydraulic fracturing. It prefers frac, a literal reduction of fracture, but at this point it's probably out of luc. Last week, Merriam-Webster announced that it was including fracking in its 2014 Collegiate Dictionary (along with spoiler alert, hashtag, selfie, and turducken, among others). Frac hasn’t caught on outside the industry –- it seems vaguely French for starters -- and its verb form, fracing, would be totally confusing. (Some industry sources employ the even more tortured frac’ing.)

Blame it on those impish enviros, always eager to mock their opponents in as few words as possible on 36-by-48-inch protest signs. “No Fracking Way,” “Frack Off,” “Don’t Frack Our Future,” and “Stop Fracking Mother Earth” are just a few of the ways shale-oil opponents have happily turned the emotionally neutral term “hydraulic fracturing” into a dirty word.

It’s clever framing – put “fracking” on the list with “death tax” and “job creator” –- but environmentalists didn’t need to hire a political wordslinger to concoct a winningly charged term. Merriam-Webster traces industry use of the term “fracking” back to 1953.

Image by iStock/Joe_Potato.

HS_ReedMcManusReed McManus is a senior editor at Sierra. He has worked on the magazine since Ronald Reagan’s second term. For inspiration, he turns to cartoonist R. Crumb’s Mr. Natural, who famously noted: “Twas ever thus.”

 

Read More

The Clean Dozen

Surcharge for Smoggers

China Chips Away at its Pollution Problem

 

Not Your Grandparents’ Road Trip: 5 Green Reasons to Visit National Parks

Wed, 05/28/2014 - 01:46 PM

Mount ranier

Wailing children, crotchety parents, sand and sunscreen in uncomfortable places… you get the idea. If this sounds familiar, chances are you’ve been on what feels like an eons-long summer trip with your family. But the National Park Service’s new, sustainable outlook on life may forever change the face of summer vacations, retrofitting the National Parks we know and love with some seriously awesome green technology.

With some of the vastest wilderness resources in the country, National Parks are feeling the brunt of climate change. Extreme flooding, serious drought, wildfires and glacial melt have meant that the severity of climate change is taken very seriously by the NPS. They are growing as a voice for climate change education and activism and are leading the way with green technology and infrastructure. On Earth Day of 2012 the NPS issued the Green Parks Plan (GPP), a comprehensive road map for change that emphasizes engaging visitors and communities in initiatives that mitigate climate change and educate about sustainability.

In the year since the plan’s debut, the National Parks have made impressive progress. Ninety-two percent of construction waste is diverted from landfills and greenhouse gas emissions are down thirteen percent. Here are five clean, green examples of why you should visit and support their efforts:

1.) The Pinnacles National Park West Side Visitors Center received a Platinum LEED certification (the highest available) for energy and water saving features—the building was even constructed using photovoltaic powers sources. Captain Planet would approve.

Sequoia Shuttle

2.) At Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, you can now take a sustainable ride through the forests—the surrounding communities have partnered with park services to implement hybrid and electric buses as transportation. Thirteen other parks have also received grants from the Department of Energy’s Clean Cities Program to make the switch from fuel hogging diesel vehicles to electric and hybrid technologies. Ah, smell that fresh, clean air! 

3.) Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks also spearheaded an initiative to start illuminating park attractions with solar power—the famous Crystal Cave is now completely lit by solar powered lights, which seriously lower energy consumption.

4.) On the East Coast, Assateague Island National Seashore is using solar power to generate light for the bathrooms, convenience store, campground office, ranger station, and parking lot.

5.) In Lake Mead National Recreation Area, the Cottonwood Cove Marina Building on Lake Mohave is the first ever LEED certified floating building, and is highly energy efficient and sustainably constructed.

Cottonwood cove floating buildingJeffrey Olson, an NPS Spokesman, said “There were over 273 million visitors to the parks last year alone, and we hope our sustainable initiative will engage visitors, neighbors and communities and to ask them to participate for the betterment of national parks and our world.”

When asked why Sierra readers should make an effort to visit the parks, Olson responded “visitor participation can have big environmental benefits. We hope our commitment to sustainability spreads and that park visitors, Sierra readers included, find opportunities to take similar steps in their own lives”.

- Photos and video courtesy of the National Parks Service

MAREN HUNSBERGER is an editorial intern at Sierra. She is a rising senior studying biology and environmental science at the College of William and Mary. She loves hiking, running, animals of all shapes and sizes, and wants to be David Attenborough when she grows up. 

 

Read More

Save the Vacation No Vacation Nation: 7 Facts That Will Have You Packing Up Public Transportation Surges in Los Angeles
 

How Can I Save Fuel on Summer Vacation Trips?

Wed, 05/28/2014 - 01:11 PM

Mr GreenHey Mr. Green,

Our family will take a long road trip by car this summer. Now don’t get on your high horse, Mister Know-It-All, and command us to ride bikes to our destination. Here’s the deal: I don’t give a damn if burning fossil fuel causes global warming, but I do want to save money on gas. How can I accomplish this? —Neal, in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin

Enjoy your trip, Neal, and keep the ol’ car radio tuned to your favorite right-wing global-warming-denial talk show so you can pick up some new rhetoric for blasting us climatological Cassandras.

There are a number of ways you can cut your fuel consumption. The first thing to do is to give your vehicle a tune-up if it hasn’t had one in awhile. Following are eight more ideas, with estimates how much they’ll save you, courtesy of the EPA and Car and Driver magazine. (The percentages have a big range because of wide variations in fuel efficiency and driving habits.)

1. Drive sensibly: Chill out, don’t stew about environmentalists or vent your road rage with jackrabbit starts, jamming on the brakes, changing speeds, etc. Aggressive and stupid driving can reduce fuel efficiency by anywhere from 5 percent to 33 percent.

2. Slow down: You can waste 30 percent or more of your fuel by speeding. For every 5 miles an hour you drive over 55, you use 6 percent more fuel.

3. Keep your cargo off the roof, if possible: Wind resistance can squander from 6 to 17 percent of your fuel on the highway.

4. Don’t idle excessively: Don’t leave the engine running when you pop into your favorite fast food joint. A minute of idling can cost 1–3 cents, depending on the type of  engine. You get zero mpg when idling.

5. Keep tires inflated: You can save up to 3 percent on fuel by keeping tires inflated to the recommended level.

6. Reduce air conditioning: You can waste up to 15 percent of your fuel by using the air conditioner. Although driving with windows open creates wind resistance and therefore reduces efficiency, the loss is considerably less than the loss from air conditioning. I once advised rolling up the windows when going over 45 mph. I hereby stand corrected.

7. Shed weight: You can waste 1 to 2 percent of fuel for every 100 extra pounds you carry. This includes human cargo. See my timely blog, “Does Obesity Waste Fuel?”  which cites a study indicating that moving overweight Americans in cars requires a billion more gallons of fuel per year than if we all weighed what health professionals recommend. 

8. Use cruise control except on steep hills, in heavy traffic, on roads that are winding or have sharp bends, or are slippery from rain, ice or snow.

If you want to go way, way deeper into saving gas, delve into "109 tips for Hypermiling.”  But beware, because some of this advice might lead to family squabbles, like “Let the most efficient driver drive,” or sound way too eco-trippy: “Drive like you ride a bike,” or be downright dangerous, like driving barefoot, coasting in neutral, turning off the engine to coast, or pushing your car instead of starting the engine when you’re only moving a short distance. - Bob Shildgen

Got a question? Ask Mr. Green!

 

READ MORE:

How Does Less Gas Become More Emissions? 

How Much Energy to Make a New Car?

Does Obesity Waste Fuel? 

 

5 Blogs about Sierra Club History

Tue, 05/27/2014 - 10:56 AM

MuirAndRooseveltThe Sierra Club was founded by John Muir and his eco-conscious compatriots 122 years ago this week. Since then the club has sought to explore, enjoy and protect this amazing planet. Together we’ve protected millions of acres of wilderness, saved endangered species and kept natural resources clean. Muir would surely have been proud of the relentless efforts of our members.

To commemorate this anniversary week enjoy these Green Life posts about the Club’s legacy.

1. Women of the Sierra Club: Marion Randall Parsons - A writer, artist, photographer, mountaineer and nature enthusiast, Parsons was a force to be reckoned with. Read all about the first lady to be elected onto our board of directors.

2. Original Beards of the Sierra Club - Beards have come back into fashion, but our earliest members were masters of this style long ago. Take a look at some of our favorite facial hair.

3. Women of the Sierra Club: Allison Chin - After working with an Inner CIty Outings group, Chin stepped up her involvement and eventually became the first board president of color. Learn more about her thoughts on the outdoors, diversity and civil disobedience. 

RetroHikingFashions4.Retro Hiking Style - Early Sierra Club ladies wore dresses and bloomers on outdoor club trips. Check out these fabulous photos from 1896 to 1946.  

5. Chiura Obata and his Sierra Legacy - After Obata was released from the interment camps he took part in Sierra High Club trips, sharing his technique with other clubbers on the trail. The painter left behind inspirational art and a story of resilience.

 

- top image courtesy of the Library of Congress

- bottom image by Joseph N. Leconte

HS_Bianca_BlogBIANCA HERNANDEZ is the Acting Web Editor at Sierra. She recently received her MA in Visual Anthropology from the University of Southern California and has written for various publications.

 

 

Environmental Media Draws Kids into the Green Movement

Wed, 05/21/2014 - 01:38 PM

Some act of vision
When you think of sustainability, chances are that young adult novels and comic books are not the first things to come to mind. But getting kids to read new narratives may be the thing that piques their interest in the world's well being. Earth-conscious novels have a long and illustrious history, from Edward Abbey's 1975 The Monkey Wrench Gang to Carl Hiaasen's 2002 Hoot. The newest wave of YA fiction is addressing the reality of contemporary teen life while honing in on green issues, like fracking and environmental justice (you can find a great list here).

Lori Ann Stephens’ new novel Some Act of Vision, for example, is a fast-paced read with a sci-fi lens. It has political and environmental intrigue, teen drama, vivid characters, and a splash of romance—it’s currently a finalist for the National Reader’s Choice Awards in the YA category. Stephens’ novel centers around a young protagonist whose life is disrupted when fracking-induced earthquakes rip her town apart. The geological disturbance destroys a nearby chemical plant, which releases a compound that has a, shall we say, interesting effect on her and her family (that's where the sci-fi comes in--no spoilers here!). Stephens says she was thinking of her own teenage son when she heard a piece about fracking on NPR. She was listening to the piece in her car when it suddenly hit her that he, and many young people his age, probably had no idea what was going on with the fracking industry in their home state of Texas.

She wanted to write a novel with elements that would appeal to young readers while sparking curiosity in real-world issues. Stephens hopes the novel will not only make young people more aware of fracking, but get them to look into it further to understand the reality of the situation. She says “Being aware and educating themselves about the reality of the situation is the first step." When she adds that "youth already feel like their world is falling apart," she's admitting that including environmental catastrophe in her novel felt like a bit of a risk. But despite the seriousness of the subject matter, Stephens hopes readers will see themselves in her protagonist and feel more empowered to explore the issues and take action on their own.

Mayah's lot

The comic book world is also taking a turn for the green and the visual nature of this medium makes it very compelling, especially for younger readers. Comics like Mayah's Lot, about a young girl's fight to keep her inner city community from being exploited by an irresponsible corporation, are created to be both entertaining and educational. The genre has become increasingly popular in the last decade or so, grabbing the attention of educators and students alike. Rebecca Bratspies, one of the authors of the comic, is also the founder of the Center for Urban Environmental Reform. She writes that the main goal comics like Mayah's Lot, is to reach "non-traditional audiences with an environmental justice message." 

Hop on the brain train to get your kids connected to the environmental issues outside their tween bubble.

 

 

 

- Photos coutesy of Lori Ann Stephens and Charlie LaGreca & Rebecca Bratspies, respectively

--Maren Hunsberger is an editorial intern at Sierra. She is a rising senior studying biology and environmental science at the College of William and Mary. She loves hiking, running, animals of all shapes and sizes, and wants to be David Attenborough when she grows up. 

 

Read More:

Peoms to Inspire Outdoor Adventures

Mothers of the Movement: Rachel Carson and Her Sisters

Book Review: EarthArt

 

Environmental Media Draws Teens into the Green Movement

Wed, 05/21/2014 - 10:26 AM


Some act of visionWhen you think of sustainability, chances are that young adult novels and comic books are not the first things to come to mind. But getting kids to read new narratives may be the thing that piques their interest in the world's well-being. The green novel for adults is nothing new (Edward Abbey’s 1975 The Monkey Wrench Gang), and the earth-conscious read for kids and teens has been rapidly evolving (Carl Hiaasen’s 2002 Hoot). The hyper-popular YA dystopian novel is even incorporating elements of eco-awareness: from the coal mines of The Hunger Games’ District 12 to the desolate wasteland outside the walls of the Divergent series, environmental devastation is taking up more space in young adult literature. The newest wave of YA fiction is breaking away from the dystopia and focusing on the reality of the present, addressing green issues like fracking and environmental justice while keeping the focus on teen life.

Lori Ann Stephens’ new novel Some Act of Vision, for example, is a fast-paced read with a sci-fi lens. Currently a finalist for the National Reader’s Choice Awards in the YA category, Stephens’ novel centers around a young ballerina whose life is disrupted when fracking-induced earthquakes rip her town apart on the eve of her big debut. The geological disturbance destroys a nearby chemical plant, which releases a compound that has a, shall we say, interesting effect on her (that's where the sci-fi comes in--no spoilers here!). The political intrigue that follows the disaster is thrilling, and the splash of first romance makes balances out the whole book perfectly.

Stephens says she was listening to a piece on NPR about fracking when she thought of the premise for the novel. It hit her that her teenage son, and many young people his age, probably had no idea what was going on with the fracking industry in their home state of Texas—things like geological instability and water pollution so bad residents could light their tap water on fire. “The first step” she says in reference to eco-awareness, “is being aware and educating [yourself] about the reality of the situation.” She admits that including environmental catastrophe in her novel felt like a bit of a risk, adding that “youth already feel like their world is falling apart”. But despite the seriousness of the subject matter, Stephens hopes readers will see themselves in her protagonist and feel more empowered to engage with their environment and take part in activism on their own.


Mayah's lotThe comic book world is also taking a turn for the green. Like young adult novels, the material is engaging and colorful, with characters so vivid you feel like you could reach out and touch them. Comics like Mayah's Lot, about a young girl's fight to keep her inner city community from being exploited by a corporation that wants to dump toxic waste in an empty lot where she’s growing a garden, showcase teen heroes bringing people together to fight for the good of the city. Rebecca Bratspies is one of the authors of the comic (along with Charlie La Greca), and is also the founder of the Center for Urban Environmental Reform.

The main goal of comics like Mayah’s Lot and YA novels like Some Act of Vision is to reach young people with the messages they may be accustomed to tuning out. As part of a narrative, environmental issues become personal and tangible for teens, ultimately using fiction to deepen their awareness of the real world around them.

 

 

-Photos courtesy of Lori Ann Stephens and Charlie La Greca & Rebecca Bratspies, respectively

MAREN HUNSBERGER is an editorial intern at Sierra. She is a rising senior studying biology and environmental science at the College of William and Mary. She loves hiking, running, animals of all shapes and sizes, and wants to be David Attenborough when she grows up. 

Read More

Mothers of the Movement: Rachel Carson and Her Sisters Books For Young Environmentalists Eco-Activities for Parents and Kids

 

 

Mothers of the Movement: Rachel Carson and Her Sisters

Tue, 05/20/2014 - 04:54 PM

Martha_maxwell Martha Maxwell with her two favorite things.

You may have heard of Rachel Carson, but have you heard the story of Martha Maxwell?  Maxwell married a miner 20 years her senior and followed him through the west, panning for gold.  When their claim was jumped by a German taxidermist she was inspired to pursue taxidermy and began shooting and stuffing animals on her own, building a large collection of species, from foxes to bighorn sheep, which she displayed at museums around the country.  A staunch vegetarian she addressed those who would call her a hypocrite by asking, “Which is the more cruel? To kill to eat? Or to kill to immortalize?”

Maxwell is just one of many inspiring women profiled in Robert Musil’s book Rachel Carson and Her Sisters. Musil had several goals in writing this book. One was to contextualize Silent Spring as the culmination Musil cover of decades of work by other women in science, who were consistently overlooked, underappreciated and dismissed by their male peers and institutions.

These ladies ranged from Victorian garden observers to die-hard chemists and marine biologists. “They are tied together by a fierce sense of activism” and beautiful writing, says Musil. Compelling writers like Rachel Carson and Terry Tempest Williams bred curiosity and bridged the civilian-scientist gap by presenting scientific evidence in a ‘readable’ format. Indeed, their writing is what drew Musil in.  He too wants “people to connect with science in an approachable way.” 

These women were not writing for the sake of writing, they all had political motivations.

Richards_telescope Ellen Richards and her mentor Maria Mitchell.

One of Musil's most intriguing subjects is Ellen Swallow Richards, the first woman admitted to MIT. She quickly established herself in chemistry and focused on sanitation.  Not one to mince words, she accused the American Public Health Association of murder for their shoddy upkeep of Boston Public Schools, which until then, had no ventilation or clean toilets. This speech rendered her unemployable, but she continued to teach chemistry and lobby for better sanitation in schools despite being blacklisted.

Women like Richards and Maxwell shattered the idea of the lady as a ‘shrinking violet.' Their dogged activism paved the way for Carson’s crusade against pesticides, argues Musil. Carson’s work has opened the doors for countless other female environmental activists. 

Rachel Carson and Her Sisters is a Rutgers University Press publication and is available on bookshelves and as an ebook now.

 

--top image courtesy of The Colorado Women's Hall of Fame, the second courtesy of Robert Musil and the third courtesy of The Vassar College Observatory

HS_Caitlin_BlogCaitlin Kauffman is an editorial intern at Sierra. She is a sea kayak and hiking guide in the Bay Area and the Greater Yellowstone area. She enjoys good eye contact and elk burgers.

 

Read More:

How Rachel Carson are You?

"Silent Spring"--Told in Vanity License Plates

Women of the Sierra Club: Marion Randall Parsons

 

No Vacation Nation: 7 Facts That Will Have You Packing Up

Tue, 05/20/2014 - 03:18 PM

Cathedral LakeWhen was the last time you took a vacation? How long did it last? These are among the important questions explored in the recent short film The Great Vacation Squeeze, written and directed by John de Graaf. De Graaf has explored the differences in vacation and leisure time between the US and Europe for years, and in 2002 he co-founded the organization Take Back Your Time “to point out the problems connected with overwork in America.”

Supported by Sierra Club Productions, this film is one of his latest projects that examines just how stark these differences are and hopes to inspire people to do something to change it. De Graaf believes that the idea of vacation and leisure is strongly intertwined with the Sierra Club’s mission statement.

“The Sierra Club's purpose is enjoying, exploring, and protecting the natural world, and it's hard to enjoy it or explore it when you don't have any time off. It also leaves you less likely to want to protect it,” he said. “As a member I think it important that the club not forget its commitment to enjoying and exploring nature.”

Which of these facts from the film will convince you it's about time for paid vacations?

Time to catch up. The US is the only wealthy country without paid vacation time, which may be an underlying cause of a whole host of issues, including stress and overwork. “Our lack of policy [mandating paid vacations] contributes to serious health problems, weakens family connections, and [reduces] the opportunity for all of us to get out in the natural world, especially children,” de Graaf said.

Strong ties. “It was John Muir, key founder of the Sierra Club, who, as I point out in the film, was the first American to advocate a paid vacation law, way back in 1876,” de Graaf said. Muir called for a law of rest that would give time off each year for people to reconnect with nature. The idea lived on in the early 20th century when President William Howard Taft suggested of a three-month long vacation for every worker.

So close, yet so far. During the Great Depression, the Labor Department proposed a two-week paid vacation law, but it failed due to business opposition. Still, two-week trips were common in America at this time, whereas they’ve now dwindled into near oblivion.

Practice what we preach. Seventy-three percent of Americans say vacations help recharge their batteries, but fewer actually take this time. Of all working Americans, 28% receive no paid vacation time and 24% get only one week or less.

Vacations are win-win. “They do wonders for us in so many ways, as every other country understands, and they are actually helpful to business productivity and creativity as well,” de Graaf said. On an individual level, vacations can be healing in that they give us relief from stressors of daily life. Time off also promotes reflection. “In idleness there is the opportunity for contemplation, there is the opportunity for soul-searching, and for seeing, for really truly, clearly seeing, what’s around us,” says Yosemite Park Ranger Shelton Johnson in the film.

Europeans have it better. On average, Europeans live longer and are less likely to suffer from chronic illness after age 50, even though they spend less on health care. Having long, paid vacation time may have something to do with this. It's known that taking breaks from work greatly reduces stress and even improves productivity. 

It’s about justice. “Most low-income Americans never have the opportunity and don't even get paid vacations,” de Graaf said. Many believe that a law mandating paid vacations would eliminate this inequality and ultimately benefit all Americans.

If you’re interested in organizing a viewing with your community, school, or local Sierra Club chapter, you can reach de Graaf at jodg@comcast.net.

--Image by David Fox, used with permission of John de Graaf

Jessica ZischkeJessica Zischke is a former editorial intern at Sierra. She is currently studying environmental studies at Dartmouth College. On campus she works as an editor of Dartbeat, the blog of the student-run newspaper The Dartmouth, and as the Sustainability Chair for her sorority, Alpha Xi Delta.

 

READ MORE:

Save the Vacation

Family Vacations: The Good, the Bad, the Eco-Friendly

Holy Green Vacation!

 

A Supercell is Born

Tue, 05/20/2014 - 11:40 AM

While you were watching a CGI Godzilla emerge from the Pacific this weekend, these stormchasers were capturing the birth of a monster storm (no special effects required).

Thanks to the time-lapse video made by Basehunters, we can see this supercell thunderstorm taking shape over Newcastle, Wyoming.  

BIANCA HERNANDEZ is the Acting Web Editor at Sierra. She recently received her MA in Visual Anthropology from the University of Southern California and has written for various publications.

 
 

Compass

Pointing the way to a clean energy future.

‘Pay-as-you-go’ solar financing hits new milestone

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 07:38 AM

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: pay-as-you-go solar is the future for those working beyond the grid.

From Pakistan to Kenya, anecdotal reports have trickled in that pay-as-you-go solar finance -- the off-grid solar market’s version of a “solar lease” --  is driving record sales. Now, we have one more data point to add to the mounting evidence. Solar market leading d.light, a manufacturer and distributor of solar light and power products that just closed a $11 million series C investment, announced it sold a record 500,000 solar systems. Those systems will serve a record 2.5 million people. This is all thanks to pay-as-you-go financing.

This announcement is a confirmation of what many in the off-grid solar market have been saying for quite some time: it’s all about unlocking finance. That’s why the solar industry continues to demand $500 million from the World Bank in order to catalyze growth. (You can support their call by signing our petition here). Of course with millions flowing into the solar market from a variety of sources, they’re not exactly waiting for international financial institutions to make a move.

But enterprise financing is just one piece of the puzzle. Access to financing for everyday consumers is just as critical to unlock solar for the masses. That’s because the upfront costs of solar technology can often times leave these clean off-grid energy products out of reach for many.

That’s why d.light is doubling down on its success by announcing a new initiative that will focus on integrating advanced product technology and service offerings for a full range of payment systems, including microloans, self-help groups, top-up cards, and mobile money. Making solar financing as easy as possible for customers is the best way to get solar power into their hands.

The new initiative, dubbed ‘Energy Access Accelerator’, will be led by d.light’s President, Ned Tozun, and Managing Director of Global Consumer Finance, Sateesh Kumar. Mr. Kumar is a former Executive Vice President of SKS Microfinance, one of the largest public microfinance institutions in the world.

And by unlocking consumer finance, that means unlocking this $12 billion solar market.

According to Donn Tice, Chairman and CEO of d.light, the  “Energy Access Accelerator will be focused on scaling distributed energy solutions. Scale requires a consistent user experience, reliable energy and flexible payment options.”

With over six million solar products currently being used around the world -- serving an estimated 36 million people -- d.light knows a little something about scale. But until now, pay-as-you-go finance, currently 20 percent of d.light’s sales, was a relatively minor arrow in the companies quiver.

With this announcement, that’s set to change, and it’s a potent signal of the emergence of consumer finance in the beyond the grid marketplace.

--Justin Guay, Associate Director, International Climate Program

 

How much water is poisoned to produce a barrel of tar sands? Just ask Pepsi.

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 07:00 AM

PepsiOver the last year, activists have been pushing PepsiCo and other companies using tar sands in their massive corporate vehicle fleets to do the right thing and stop using this dirty source of fuel that's poisoning our water, our climate, and our communities.

You might remember when activists unveiled a Pepsi can re-design in the hottest spots of San Francisco and New York City to highlight the company's use of tar sands.

You might remember when a no tar sands protest showed up outside the door of an environmental conference for the food and beverage industry that PepsiCo sponsored.

You might remember when we showed up at PepsiCo's annual shareholder meeting to speak in front of the board and share firsthand the impacts of tar sands on refinery communities.

You might remember when a team of activists pulled a nighttime operation to make sure that attendees at the corporate Sustainable Brands conference knew that Pepsi and Coke are making climate change worse by using tar sands.

You might remember all of these actions - and many others - because you helped make them happen.  Over the last year, tens of thousands of activists have called on the PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi and on the company to stop using tar sands and slash oil use in their vehicle fleets.

While all this was happening, we've been working hard behind the scenes with the company to help them step up and do the right thing -- and it's the hard work of activists that has brought PepsiCo to the negotiating table.

Sadly, though, despite tens of thousands of people speaking up and taking action, despite the commitments that 19 other big companies have made around tar sands, PepsiCo hasn't made enough progress towards making the commitment to say no to this dirty fuel source. Conversations have been happening, but we know that conversations aren't enough. We know that using tar sands is not acceptable for the climate, for our communities, or for our water.

So, it's time to step up the game.  

Over the next month, activists will be bringing the heat and getting serious with Pepsi, asking questions like this one: "How much water is poisoned to produce one barrel of tar sands? Just ask Pepsi." You can help out by sharing the graphic featured in this blog post on your social media pages and by posting it to Pepsi's Facebook wall.

We've been asking nicely. Earlier this year, we released a report and sent it right to the PepsiCo Board of Directors highlighting the effects of tar sands on water, an issue that PepsiCo publically says it cares a lot about. But now's the time to ask the hard questions.

We're ready to step up, Pepsi. Are you?

-- Rachel Rye Butler, Sierra Club Beyond Oil Campaign

 

Washington supports highest cleanup standard at toxic port -- and no coal exports

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 10:21 AM

Coal export hearing5On Wednesday night, more than 100 community members turned out in force at the Washington state Department of Ecology's hearing on proposed cleanup options for the old Reynolds aluminum smelter site in Longview, Washington.

Currently contaminated by cyanide, fluoride, PCBs and other known carcinogens, the site must undergo cleanup funded by Alcoa and Millennium Bulk Terminals, the latter of which wants to use the polluted port as a controversial coal export facility.

The community is staunchly against the coal export plan, and of the six options being presented as "solutions" to the toxic site, residents overwhelmingly support the highest cleanup option -- level six.

"We have one chance to clean up the site's toxic legacy for good and make this industrial river property a job creator with high-value manufacturing potential," said Diane Dick, vice president of Longview residents' group Landowners and Citizens for a Safe Community (LCSC).

Every speaker during the hearing voiced their support for option six and spoke up for creating clean and safe economic opportunity for the area.

"This region needs jobs," said Gayle Kiser, LCSC president. "But we shouldn't have to compromise on the health of our families and natural resources, especially when the Department of Ecology has identified options that can address all three."

The local Sierra Club is working closely with the LCSC to demand a proper cleanup of the site that includes  good jobs for the community. Longview residents say it's time for a positive change at the site.

"We've been mistreated time and again by companies at this site. And it's important to remember: Millennium is a coal company, not a cleanup company," said the Rev. Kathleen Patton, Episcopal priest in the Diocese of Olympia, and a Longview resident. "Longview families live just across the tracks from this site. They deserve a full cleanup that protects community health and a port that attracts a wide array of economically stable industries and family-wage jobs."

 

Texas Democrats Band Together to Oppose Fast Tracking a Flawed Trade Deal

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 08:08 AM

The massive Trans-Pacific Partnership, a proposed trade deal stalled time-and-again by grassroots and Congressional opposition, has a new hurdle to get over -- the Texas Democratic Party.

Thanks to the work of the Sierra Club’s Lone Star Chapter and allies, the Texas Democratic Party has taken an important stance on international trade policy by passing a resolution and including a party platform plank that explicitly opposes “fast-track” legislation and demands transparency in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations.

President Obama has pushed for fast-track authority, which limits the role of Congress to casting yes-or-no votes on trade pacts, limiting debate, and forbidding amendments. To make matters worse, the TPP has been negotiated in near secrecy for more than four years, without meaningful opportunities for public input.

The Texas Democratic Party’s statement reflects an alliance between labor, environmental, and human rights activists, enjoining U.S. trade policy to “combat child and slave labor, sweatshops, environmental degradation, and other practices that turn global trade into a race to the bottom”--as the platform states.  

Hal Suter, Chair of International Trade and Labor Relations at the Lone Star Chapter of the Sierra Club, co-chaired the inaugural Fair Trade Caucus at the Texas Democratic Convention with representatives of the United Automobile Workers and the Communications Workers of America, a coalition that was integral to the resolution’s passage. David Griggs, Political Chair of the Lone Star Chapter, was selected for the Platform Advisory Committee and led the energy and environment sections of the Texas Democratic Platform. The new caucus attracted two Congressional representatives: Reps. Al Green and Eddie Bernice Johnson.

Organizers expected an audience of 20 to 30 at the caucus as the resolution was being discussed.

“Not only did it go over, they needed to give us a bigger room!” Suter said. 

The caucus was filled with nearly 200 people, representing consumer advocacy groups, MoveOn.org, union members, environmentalists, and others. Suter highlighted that collaboration on trade provided a productive common ground between these groups, adding, “This is something that the Sierra Club can do in other states.”

Why are all of these groups so concerned about fast track? Fast track would rush the approval of the TPP and another huge agreement the U.S. is currently negotiating with the European Union -- the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or TTIP. Sierra Club reports on the TPP and the TTIP have highlighted the risks that these trade agreements pose to our climate and communities.

Particularly in light of the extreme secrecy of these trade negotiations, limiting Congressional oversight over trade negotiations would only further limit the public and our Congressional Representatives from influencing far-reaching trade agreements.

The Texas Democratic Party has taken a critical step by incorporating their stance on fast track into their official platform.

Trade has incredible potential to foster sustainability and productivity internationally. On June 28, Texas Democrats showed solidarity with environmental and labor groups in seeking transparency and an inclusive process to secure free trade agreements that truly benefit people and the environment. The Fair Trade Caucus hopes that Texas Democrats have created a precedent for other states’ Democratic Party Platforms.

--Ethan Samet, Intern, Sierra Club’s Responsible Trade Program

 

Taking a stand against a proposed coal export terminal in Louisiana

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 11:27 AM

Yard Signs

Gretna, La., might be a small city, but the residents are banding together to speak out against a proposed coal export terminal and the increased coal trains that would come with it. In the past month they've packed two community meetings to learn more about the proposed RAM Terminal coal export facility.

Back in June, dozens of people attended a Clean Gulf Commerce Coalition public meeting as a way to kick off the Gretna movement against the facility. The facility itself it planned for Plaquemines Parish, but the rail line serving it bisects Gretna.

The meeting followed weeks of canvassing, phonebanking, and media outreach to publicize the meeting, collect petition signatures, and draw attention to the problems of coal trains rumbling through historic districts and along major commuter highways intersections, said Sierra Club organizer Devin Martin.

"It was a joint effort between the Sierra Club, the Gulf Restoration Network, and the Clean Gulf Commerce Coalition," said Martin.

The movement's been making the news as well:

"Gretna has been making a lot of progress, preserving its historic district, renovating its old post office. It seems Gretna is on the upswing,'' said Devin Martin, a Sierra Club organizer who lives just outside Gretna, in neighboring Algiers. "The last thing the city needs is to have that rail line turn into an industrial corridor.''

Q & A

Then on July 9, Gretna residents packed a Gretna City Council meeting to get the chance to testify their concerns about the possibility of coal trains passing through their neighborhoods, with all the attendant health risks, traffic congestion, emergency response times, and economic and quality of life concerns that would rattle the town.

"They gave some of the best, most heartfelt, moving, and powerful statements I've ever witnessed in my four years with the Club," said Martin.

Martin says the weeks since that first June town meeting included some excellent organizing - from tabling at farmer's markets and cafes, to business outreach, and weekly community meetings.

"Our goal was to introduce our presence and show the council that this is a vital issue that cannot be ignored any longer, and that the Mayor and council must take leadership and elevate and amplify the concerns of their constituents to state and federal decision makers," said Martin.

The coalition is asking the Gretna City Council to pass a resolution that would oppose coal trains, as well requesting that the appropriate state and federal agencies involved in the RAM Terminal permitting conduct a full public health, economic, and environmental impact analysis, which has not been done.

"The Council is definitely feeling the heat, and we intend to come back in August with even more residents, business owners, and health professionals to encourage the Council to pass this resolution," said Martin.

"From there, we will work to engage the entire Parish of Jefferson, the most populous parish in Louisiana, to do the same to stop this new coal export terminal that puts so much at risk for so many in one of the most vulnerable regions of the world for climate change and sea level rise."

 

New Report: Trade Talks Threaten to Undermine EU Climate Policy and Bring Tar Sands To Europe

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 10:10 AM

image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14071715/a960c0af-29d0-4f06-9177-8b34a844e4aa.png Photo courtesy of the "Dirty Deals" report.

As 2014 brings in a new wave of global temperature records, countries implementing policies that reduce climate disrupting pollution should be lauded for their efforts.

But a report released today by the Sierra Club, Friends of the Earth Europe, Friends of the Earth U.S., Transport & Environment, Greenpeace, and Council of Canadians presents new evidence that the U.S. government is joining the Canadian government and oil lobbyists in pushing the European Union (EU) to weaken an important climate policy called the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD). Even more troubling, U.S. efforts to include the FQD in negotiations on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) -- a free trade agreement being negotiated in secret between the U.S. and EU -- could critically undermine the EU’s ability to lower climate emissions.

The EU adopted the FQD in 2009 as means to reduce the carbon intensity of transportation fuels and ultimately lower transportation emissions by six percent by 2020. In 2011, the European Commission drafted proposed guidelines for how fuel suppliers could implement the policy and proposed that different types of fuels be classified by their climate emissions, meaning some fuel sources would be labelled as having higher greenhouse gas intensity values than others.  Such a system would encourage fuel suppliers to switch from dirtier fuels to cleaner types in order to meet the emissions reduction target.

Not surprisingly, oil corporations and their lobbyists on both side of the Atlantic have used every tool at their disposal to undermine the FQD.  They have been joined by the Canadian government --led by the infamously pro-tar sands Prime Minister Stephen Harper-- and argued that the FQD discriminates against Canada’s tar sands. Canada has even threatened the EU with a World Trade Organization challenge. In reality, the EU’s proposed science-based approach would label all carbon intensive sources of oil including liquefied coal, oil shale and tar sands as having high greenhouse gas intensity-- not discriminate against countries.

Sadly, the United States government, at the urging of the oil industry, has joined Canada and its oil industry in raising concerns about the landmark climate policy.  Moreover, the U.S. now has a new playing field in which to weaken the FQD:  negotiations for the proposed U.S.-EU trade pact, also known as the TTIP.

Ideally, a 21st century U.S.-EU trade agreement would allow -- and encourage -- countries to implement policies that would address the growing threat of climate disruption. Instead, today’s report highlights that our own U.S. negotiators seem to be characterizing the FQD as a potential barrier to trade, rather than a necessary policy that should be emulated.

As detailed in the report, despite claims from the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) to Congress that “USTR is not pressing the European Commission for any particular treatment of crude oil under the FQD,” emails uncovered by Friends of the Earth Europe reveal that the U.S. has, in fact, pushed the EU to weaken the FQD proposal. They’ve done so by encouraging the EU to strip out parts of the implementing guidelines that would “single out“ the most polluting sources of oil like tar sands.

This would be akin to removing the nutritional information listed on food products. Rice cakes and doughnuts have distinct nutritional properties, which is something governments have decided that consumers have a right to know. Equally, the proposed FQD would recognize that all fuels are not created equal and that some release more climate-disrupting gases than others.  But representatives of the USTR do not seem to agree, and correspondence indicates that they are pushing for a policy that would hinder the EU’s ability to flag tar sands imports as particularly greenhouse gas disrupting.

Disturbingly, the weakening of an important climate initiative in the TTIP negotiations should come as no surprise. Last week, a leaked trade document uncovered by the Washington Post revealed an EU proposal for the TTIP that would force the U.S. to automatically approve all exports of crude oil and liquefied natural gas to the EU.

The TTIP (which began a new negotiating round this week) is facing massive public opposition to proposed provisions like investor-state dispute settlement, which would empower corporations to sue countries over environmental policies they don’t like before private trade tribunals. Today’s report reveals that even the FQD—an ambitious climate policy that the EU has been pushing for years—could be critically weakened simply in the process of the secretive, non-inclusive negotiations.

Read our report here .

--Courtenay Lewis, Campaign Representative, Sierra Club Responsible Trade Program, and Ilana Solomon, Director, Sierra Club Responsible Trade Program

 

Sierra Club and Center for American Progress premier solar documentary using Google Glass

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 08:01 AM

. Photo courtesy of Harnessing the Sun to Keep the Lights on in India

Today, the Sierra Club and Center for American Progress (CAP) debuted a new documentary that highlights the vital role off-grid solar power is playing around the world, particularly in developing areas like Uttar Pradesh, India.

By using Google Glass, Sierra Club and CAP were able to capture the life-transforming power off-grid solar energy has had in Uttar Pradesh. Through the eyes of Google Glass and traditional filming equipment, Justin Guay and Vrinda Manglik of the Sierra Club and Andrew Satter of CAP not only saw solar panels being installed, but they talked to the very people whose lives have been transformed by solar power.

All this week we’ve been releasing behind the scenes footage of our journey in anticipation of the  launch of our documentary. You can check out our videos on Twitter using the hashtag #PutSolarOnIt or by clicking here.

Make sure you check out our documentary, “Harnessing the Sun to Keep the Light on in India” and take action to help alleviate global energy poverty.

--Justin Guay, Associate Director, International Climate Program, and Vrinda Manglik, Associate Campaign Representative, International Clean Energy Access

 

'Walls & The Tiger' highlights rural activists' challenge

Wed, 07/16/2014 - 07:19 AM

In this modern day David vs. Goliath, rural activists of the Kona Forest region in South India are fighting back against a decade of environmental destruction and human rights violations.

Walls & The Tiger, a new documentary set to be released this fall, follows these activists in their campaign to protect and sustain traditional communities and fragile ecosystems from corrupt industrialization.  Propelled by graceful, urgent storytelling and filled with revelations of courage in the face of adversity, this film adds cathartic force to one of the most crucial political and human rights issues of the 21st century: the decimation of rural people and their environments in the name of development.

“We accept the development. But not at the cost of the environment and not at the cost of the poor mans’ resources,” one of the activists in the documentary explains. “It is our responsibility to provide fresh air and fresh water to our next generations. Without this, development means nothing.”

Unlike many similar communities that crumbled at the will of big industry, these Kona Forest villagers have decided to take on the development that stands to destroy their environment and livelihoods.

By uniting to protect their land and resources, everyday farmers have become savvy activists, actively working to protect their livelihoods and taking to the courts, filing a lawsuit against powerful global forces. Their story will stand as a model for many communities that face similar situations throughout the world. Despite facing arrests and abuse from the authorities, these rural activists have worked to fearlessly protect their established way of life.

In the face of adversity, they have demonstrated that when the “walls” of development encroach upon them, “the tiger” strikes back.

Sushma Kallam, the director of the film, has spent the past 13 years in the United States working as an IT consultant for top global corporations, specializing in supply-chain management. During this time, she began to understand the devastating impacts certain development policies have had on rural life throughout the world.

Her film shows how expedited industrialization and development have, in many ways, resulted in personal wealth for only a few while leaving large communities that were initially self-sustainable subject to environmental and agrarian crisis.  As both a corporate consultant and a descendant of farmers, Kallam has a unique perspective in connecting these two disparate worlds by showing the effects of their interdependency to meet our consumer demands.

Given her intimate access and years spent filming alongside farmers, government officials, and activists, Kallam takes us into the lives and families of those directly facing this struggle and gives viewers a rare opportunity to understand this complex issue.

Walls & The Tiger is set to be released at movie festivals in the U.S., UK, and Europe this fall, and Kallam hopes it will build and strengthen international coalitions as well as leverage public awareness around the issue. Ultimately, Kallam and her team hope that this campaign will affect policy change and measures by ensuring that awareness is built amongst people in India and throughout the world to protect sustainable communities and the environment.

To watch the trailer for Walls & The Tiger, click here.

--Neha Mathew, Executive Coordinator, Beyond Coal Campaign

 

Healing Walk in Photos: Stronger When We Walk Together

Tue, 07/15/2014 - 10:35 AM

This weekend, communities from across the northeast San Francisco Bay came together in the fourth of four "connecting the dots" refinery Healing Walks that connected fenceline communities facing refineries and crude by rail oil infrastructure in Contra Costa County.

Led by Indigenous elders, the walks focus on healing and on connecting communities, with prayers offered at each refinery along the way for healing and for a just transition away from fossil fuels.  

Many described the walks as a powerful experience -- walking together, praying together, interacting with community members along the way, and building connections to grow the resistance.  

The communities of Pittsburg, Benicia, Martinez, Rodeo, and Richmond, California, joined together in these walks that spanned 44 miles from the Valero refinery in Pittsburg south through the refinery corridor to end on Saturday at the Chevron refinery in Richmond.

Saturday's walk spanned 13 miles from the Phillips 66 refinery in Rodeo to the Chevron refinery in Richmond -- here are some photos that attempt to capture the experience and the strength and spirit of these communities that are fighting for their health, safety, and survival.
Healing walk view
Here's the view looking up the train tracks at the refinery in Rodeo. As participants gathered, a train carrying oil passed on the tracks, shaking the ground where the Healing Walk participants were standing.

Participants gather and sign in for the opening ceremony before the walk begins in Rodeo. Flags and signs, drums and singing were key parts of the walk.
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The Healing Walk makes its way into Pinole, Calif. Many of the roads we walked on Saturday did not have sidewalks, spreading the walkers out in single and double file along the side of the road.
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The walk stopped at the Kinder Morgan facility to offer prayers right in front of a crude by rail facility. The communities have been banding together to fight proposals to bring more and more explosive Bakken crude by rail into the Bay area. The Healing Walk on Saturday honored the memory of 47 residents of Lac-Mégantic in Canada who were killed this week last year when a train carrying explosive Bakken crude derailed and incinerated the town. Many of the residents of these Bay Area communities live along crude by rail "blast zones" that could face a similar tragedy.
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It was particularly moving this weekend to hear Penny Opal Plant, one of the lead organizers for the walks, pray at the Chevron refinery for the workers' safety and for the workers to continue to have jobs that support their families as we transition away from the fossil fuel economy, as security and workers for the refinery looked on.  

Richmond residents and community groups also talked about their struggle for health and safety with the refinery in their back yard, especially with the recent Chevron refinery explosion that sent many residents to hospitals.
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As the walk ended at the waterfront in Richmond, in view of the marine facility where Chevron ships its oil, residents from each of the five communities connected through the walk expressed their commitment to each other and expressed gratitude for these walks bringing them together across 44 miles of the refinery corridor in the northeast San Francisco Bay.

Because we're stronger when we walk together.

-- Text and photos by Rachel Rye Butler, Sierra Club Beyond Oil Campaign. 

 

Selling Solar in India Through the Lens of Google Glass

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 08:25 AM

 

Solar power is the key to ending energy poverty.

No, this isn’t some out-of-touch Silicon Valley pipe dream. Innovative companies like Simpa Networks and OMC power are pioneering new energy models for rural populations that deliver everything from LED lightbulbs and Skinny Grids to Off-Grid Wi-Fi to pay-as-you-go solar home systems.

To better understand how they empower people, the Sierra Club and Center for American Progress (CAP) teamed up to document their efforts in a hotbed of off-grid solar activity: Uttar Pradesh, India. We brought along a pair of Google Glass to document our travel and give the world a first-hand look at our global distributed energy future.

 

If there’s one thing we learned about their efforts, it’s this: small is big.

All those small-scale solar home systems and mini-grids these companies are building add up to a whopping $12 billion energy market potential. Even more exciting, this market is already booming. From 80,000 solar home systems installed every month in Bangladesh, to a 95-percent compound annual growth rate in Sub-Saharan Africa’s off-grid solar market, it’s easy to see why investment is rapidly growing.

But, despite all this growth, public institutions have still not stepped up to provide the investment these companies require to truly scale their efforts. Perhaps the lone exception to this rule is President Obama’s exciting new “Beyond the Grid” initiative, but even that is not enough. That’s why entrepreneurs are demanding $500 million to catalyze faster growth from leading development institutions like the World Bank.

But lost amidst growth rates and investments is the human story yearning to be told.

From Mathura to Atroli, solar power has helped transform the lives of countless Indians. In Mathura, we met farmers who have saved untold amounts of money by switching from expensive kerosene lamps to inexpensive solar power. We met rural shopkeepers who are now able to stay open later in the evenings, which means more money in their pockets. And we met rural seamstresses who now use cleaner, cheaper solar lighting when they weave India’s famous saris.

 

But perhaps the most poignant moment was when we heard from Vishal Shukla, a local villager who now lives and works in Delhi for a non-profit organization, about the effect solar energy has had on his daughter’s lives. When he was growing up, Vishal didn’t have reliable light to study by in the evenings, and he struggled with his education. Fast forward to 2014, and Vishal’s daughters now enjoy cheaper, cleaner solar LED lighting that helps them study at night. Thanks to solar lamps, his daughters now have a brighter future, both literally and figuratively.

This is a testament to the immediate and transformative effect even small amounts of clean energy can have on people’s lives. By leapfrogging the dirty, ineffective centralized energy grid that has failed these rural populations for decades, companies are building an entirely new system, one which puts power directly in the hands of the people.

To see more of the effect solar is having on the lives of people like Vishal follow #PutSolarOnIt on Twitter as the Sierra Club and CAP release behind-the-scenes footage of our trip all this week. Then on Thursday, join us for the world premiere of our documentary, “Harnessing the Sun to Keep Lights on in India,” and see why solar truly is the key to ending energy poverty.

--Justin Guay, Associate Director, International Climate Program, Vrinda Manglik, Associate Campaign Representative, International Clean Energy Access, and Andrew Satter, Director of Video, Center for American Progress

 
 

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